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Medical Tourism Going Pro




There was a time in India when Air travel, matrimony, Jobs and Real estate were not organised, and then came Yatra.com, Bharatmatrimony.com, Naukri.com and magicbricks.com to organise it..Result= Major Hit



If we have a look at the medical tourism side of Online Reach and approach, We have everything A rich heritage, toursit attractions, High tech specialists, Good hospitals..everything...






Then why even good sites like recoverdiscover.com are not getting enough traffic, The website though older than Blog are not able to get good rankings. While the Government has been most positively speaking about promoting medical tourism, it seems that when opportunity comes calling, it is looking the other way.










Read this:



Government stance
"We have not come to that stage of taking that leap in medical tourism yet," said B. Suman, Tourism Director, for not participating in the expo. "Hospitals here have not come up as expected," Mr. Suman said. "However, a meeting will be held in the end of April and the Government will be planning some promotion in West Asia and Europe," he added.









Why are we failing?



Concept failed to ‘mature’ due to lack of synergy between Tourism Department and hospitals
Insurance companies prefer sending patients only to JCI certified hospitals.



A decade back, when medical tourism was introduced in twin cities, it was touted as the next big sector, with a potential to match the growth of information technology and biotechnology.
Ironically, IT and biotech have forged ahead, while medical tourism is still struggling to emerge out of its embryonic state.
Presently, flow of foreign patients can be at best described as ‘modest’. In a day, only about 15 to 20 patients from Bangladesh, Middle East, Sri Lanka, are admitted at Apollo, Care and L.V. Prasad Eye Institute. Given the presence of best doctors, when compared globally, this is modest.






Why do people travel abroad for Treatments?



People are trying to find better deals abroad. Health care is expensive in the UK; not in monetary terms, but due to a high time cost from long waiting lists. Health care is expensive in the U.S.; not due to time costs from waiting lists, but from high monetary cost.






“More than 70,000 Britons will have treatment abroad this year – a figure that is forecast to rise to almost 200,000 by the end of the decade.” Many of these individuals are seeking treatment in countries such as India, Hungary, Turkey, Germany, Malaysia, Poland and Spain.






Why health care is much cheaper in the above stated countries?



Health care systems suffer from Baumol’s cost disease: it’s a labor-intensive service that doesn’t offer huge scope for gains in labor productivity. The number of hours it takes to manufacture a car is consistently falling, but the number of hours it takes to perform doctor’s visits is roughly the same as it has always been. As a society gets richer, in order to attract workers, the labor intensive service has to pay competitive wages with the sectors where productivity is rising rapidly; that means that costs for labor-intensive services rise faster than the general price level.






What is the Success Key?



88% of the people that begin research on medical tourism actually fail to carry-out their intentions. This is attributed to an incomplete understanding about the medical travel experience.Remember the three key words...TTT, III i.e.



Trust-----------------> TPA----------------------->Transaction



Information-------------> IDEA---------------->Induction



Read this story of a Medical Tourism Seeker and this will surely help you understand the Psyche of a Tourist...












will come up with more.....
























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